Granny cams

She’s an adult, after all, and certain aspects of patient care may expose her nude body or intimate activities like toileting or bathing.

And if she has dementia, she may not be able to consent to the surveillance, even if you think it’s in her best interest.

Sign up for the AARP Health Newsletter In Oklahoma, New Mexico and Texas, you can legally put a nanny cam or “granny cam” – a motion-activated video camera – in your mother’s nursing-home room.

Several other states have been considering following suit.

A new article on an industry website called Senior Housing News reveals that a growing number of states across the country are considering legislation to allow what are commonly called “Granny Cams” in skilled nursing homes – and some of these new laws would expand camera monitoring to assisted living facilities and other types of senior housing. Simply put, it’s a camera installed at the request (and expense) of the family of a nursing home resident that monitors the type of care the resident is receiving.

Signs of elder abuse or neglect can include unexplained injuries or bruising, bedsores, or malnutrition.

Balancing Individual Privacy Rights and Preventing Elder Abuse Currently, no federal law grants individuals with the right place electronic surveillance equipment in nursing homes thereby leaving each state to implement their own laws.

For states that have enacted or are considering legislation addressing electronic monitoring, finding the right balance between protecting an individual’s right to privacy and preventing the potential for elder abuse has been a challenge.

Families seeking to discover what happens to their loved one when they’re away have increasingly turned to using “granny cams.” Similar to nanny cameras used by parents to keep a watchful eye on their children, electronic surveillance cameras have been used by some families in nursing homes to observe their family member.

Some recordings have captured shocking acts of elder abuse.

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